East Liverpool Historical Society

 


 

THE FIRE IN PICTURE AND NEWSPAPER

In an effort to put things in proper perspective I'm going to make an explanation of the buildings involved that made up the Ogilvie department store, at least, in the latter half of the 20th century. We start with the main Ogilvie building which was located on the corner of E. 5th St. And Washington Street. That building occupied that entire corner going north along Washington to diamond Alley. Across diamond Alley to the north of the main Ogilvie store was the Knowles building. There was a enclosed walkway over diamond Alley, from the second floor of the main Ogilvie's building, to the second floor of the Knowles building. The south end of the first floor of the Knowles building was the Allen shoe store. The north end of the first floor was the Associates Loan Copany. The second floor of the Knowles building was the Ogilvie's toy department, appliance and furniture department and other goods along with offices. On the third floor were the advertising department, workshops for displays, storage rooms and the employees lounge. Stock from Ogilvie's was also stored over Hemie's and in the third floor of the corner building owned by Rappert. The second floor over Geers was vacant.

The second floor of the Woolworth's 5 and 10 housed the Ogilvie's fabrics department. There was a short enclosed walkway between Ogilvie's second floor and Woolworth's second floor connecting two buildings.

Maybe a little easier to read.

The Evening Review. Wed. Jan. 8, 1974 continued from page 1.

8The Evening Review. Wed. Jan. 9, 1974.

The Evening Review. Wed. Jan. 9, 1974.

 

Jeff Langdon added 8 photos to Downtown fire. August 19, 2012 These photos were donated by Tom Carnegie and the photographer was Terry Kapp. I believe this was 1974.

Jeff Langdon added 8 photos to Downtown fire. August 19, 2012 These photos were donated by Tom Carnegie and the photographer was Terry Kapp. I believe this was 1974.

 

Not the greatest picture in ther world but it is a picture that does show the enclosed walkway from the second floor of Oglivie's to the 2nd floor of of the Knowles building across the alley behind it on Washington St.

 


 

THE DECLINE AND END DOWNTOWN

The Evening Review, Wed. Nov. 30, 1977.

Permission and courtesy of Frank "Digger" Dawson Picking Elderberries "A small Town Story."

THREE STORIES: A few days ago We had emailed Frank Dawson asking him if he remembered when the Ogilvie's store closed downtown. He said to check his book Picking Elderberries A Small Town Story. The above is all we could find in Frank's book. In the meantime he would see what he could find. Today We received a phone call from Dan Ogilvie. He said Frank had called him and asked if he would call me. In the course of our conversation he told me three stories. We want to share them with you here now. Danís grandfather had a tradition. Danís father carried on that tradition when he took over the store during the Great Depression. That tradition was every Saturday night all the drapes would be close and all the windows so that nobody could look in on the Lordís day the following Sunday. That tradition carried on for years and years. Dan said that occasionally maybe one the drapes had not been closed and the janitor or his father would get a phone call Saturday night saying that oneof the drapes at the store wasnít closed and they would have to go down the store and clothes that drape. Story number 2 on Christmas Eve evening when Dan was about five years old his father received a phone call from somebody out in the country in West Virginia saying that they had not received their order of the sled for their child for Christmas. Dan said his father got in the car, Dan went with him to the store, got a sled and drove snow-covered roads to deliver it to the man whose order hadnít arrived yet. Story number three. A former resident of East Liverpool who had moved to California sent a handkerchief to the Ogilvie store downtown with an apology for stealing it when she lived here in East Liverpool as a child.

Dan Ogilvie checked with some of his relatives and siblings and came up with this. In the spring of 1985 the Ogilive family sold the downtown store to Frank Mangano. They believe that Mr. Mangano closed the downtown store and moved it to Calcutta in 1987. He had a new Ogilvie's Department Store Building built in Calcutta. Named that Plaza Olgivies Square. He then closed the Ogilives's Store downtown and moved the entire operation to Calcutta. That move pretty much doomed the dowtown.

It is believed that that store closed in 1990 or 1991.

That sign used to say Ogilvie Square. Now that building is leased or rented by the US Veterans Administration and is the VA Out-Patient Center in East Liverpool. Ohio.

 


 

SOME PICTURES TAKEN DURING THE 2010 ALL CLASS CLASS REUNION.

CONTINUE ON TO Ogilvie's Department Store3

 

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